Archives

Tag: respect

|February 25, 2015|2 Comments

On February 10, we learned that Brian Williams had been suspended by NBC news for six months without pay following the revelation that he provided false information regarding a 2003 wartime incident in Iraq. His case made as much news as many of the stories he and his colleagues regularly reported. While the circumstances are unique, there’s a vital lesson here for any organization facing what I call “big shot” …

Continue Reading

|September 19, 2014|One Comment

Humans make quick decisions. We react reflexively to strange, threatening, and potentially life-threatening situations. It’s part of how we survive. Less dramatically but more frequently, we have routine interactions where we meet someone and later realize we’d gotten a “good” or “bad” impression about that person. Maybe this “feeling” translated into an instant like or dislike, all based on an encounter that lasted only a few seconds. But they can

Continue Reading

|September 9, 2014|2 Comments

I have a new next-door neighbor.  And she’s really rude.

Well, actually I haven’t met her yet.

But that’s what my mail carrier said.  She told me, “I met your new neighbor.  She is really rude.”  That was the conclusion my mail carrier came to following a “discussion” with my neighbor that took place via yellow sticky notes left for each other over the course of several days.  At issue

Continue Reading

|July 17, 2014|No Comments

During a routine physical, your physician informs you your blood pressure is extremely high. She advises you to live a healthier lifestyle, but beyond that doesn’t tell you how to treat the condition or what could happen if you do nothing. Not a very effective way of convincing you to adjust your habits, is it?

Unfortunately, that’s exactly how some organizations, including healthcare, are handling unprofessional, abusive conduct, or what …

Continue Reading

|May 7, 2014|2 Comments

There are many ways that leaders and co-workers can detract from the performance of those around them. They can be purposely mean spirited, sexually or racially offensive, or downright cruel. While it’s hard for most of us to fathom, for some people, demeaning others brings satisfaction or a sense of superiority. But that’s not always what motivates abusive behavior.

For self-styled, high-performing perfectionists, special pressures may arise when they have …

Continue Reading