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Tag: management

|February 8, 2018|No Comments

You probably already know it’s illegal to retaliate against an employee for engaging in a protected activity (such as reporting or complaining about something unlawful).

But maybe you didn’t know how broadly the idea of “retaliation” can be defined by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or how many forms retaliation can take and still be legally punishable.

Retaliation claims are by far the most common claims the EEOC receives, …

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|February 25, 2015|2 Comments

On February 10, we learned that Brian Williams had been suspended by NBC news for six months without pay following the revelation that he provided false information regarding a 2003 wartime incident in Iraq. His case made as much news as many of the stories he and his colleagues regularly reported. While the circumstances are unique, there’s a vital lesson here for any organization facing what I call “big shot” …

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|October 9, 2014|3 Comments

recent Gallup survey foundisengagedd that 70% of American workers are “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” and are emotionally disconnected from their workplaces. These findings are troubling because high levels of engagement translate into better productivity, creativity, retention, and reputation, the not-so-secret-sauces of excellence and competitive advantage. The report includes suggestions on how organizations and leaders can turn these scores around, a top-of-mind mission for many human resource and

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|September 17, 2013|No Comments

positive workplace resized 600How do you know when an organization is really committed to a culture change initiative?  I believe the lodestar boils down to this: whether it’s being led by or simply given token support by senior leaders. There’s no great wisdom in this observation. The real question is: “How do you know that the commitment is really present and not just lip service?” As it’s long been said, and rightly, “talk …

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|August 29, 2013|No Comments

Don’t worry, the first, four-letter word a child learns is likely not the one you are thinking. It’s “FAIR.”

We understand from early childhood the difference between more or less, better or worse. I was reminded of this recently by one of our clients who challenged leaders in her company to consider ways in which they demonstrate their commitment to treating employees fairly. “When my son was as young as …

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