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Tag: legal workplace

|September 19, 2014|One Comment

Humans make quick decisions. We react reflexively to strange, threatening, and potentially life-threatening situations. It’s part of how we survive. Less dramatically but more frequently, we have routine interactions where we meet someone and later realize we’d gotten a “good” or “bad” impression about that person. Maybe this “feeling” translated into an instant like or dislike, all based on an encounter that lasted only a few seconds. But they can

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|May 7, 2014|2 Comments

There are many ways that leaders and co-workers can detract from the performance of those around them. They can be purposely mean spirited, sexually or racially offensive, or downright cruel. While it’s hard for most of us to fathom, for some people, demeaning others brings satisfaction or a sense of superiority. But that’s not always what motivates abusive behavior.

For self-styled, high-performing perfectionists, special pressures may arise when they have …

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|August 29, 2013|No Comments

Don’t worry, the first, four-letter word a child learns is likely not the one you are thinking. It’s “FAIR.”

We understand from early childhood the difference between more or less, better or worse. I was reminded of this recently by one of our clients who challenged leaders in her company to consider ways in which they demonstrate their commitment to treating employees fairly. “When my son was as young as …

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|August 26, 2013|No Comments

Colors mean a lot in our workplaces. They can symbolize issues, groups, and messages. Think of black, white, pink, red, and green, and, more than likely, several associations will quickly come to mind. Green means “go” or “money” or “environmentally conscious.” Most color associations are fairly easy to come up with. The color, grey, however, can be a bit more challenging. It stands for ambiguity.  Dealing with uncertainty, particularly when …

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|June 25, 2013|No Comments

The New York Times Test is mentioned often in the context of corporate misbehavior. It basically says that you can decide whether or not you should do something by considering whether or not you’d want it (and your name) to appear in an article on the front page of the New York Times.

At first it sounds like a practical, useful standard. Well, it’s clever, but that’s about it. If …

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